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Harvard EdCasts

By Matt Weber 09/20/2017 4:40 PM EDT
Girls Who Code

Reshma Saujani, founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, reflects on why closing the gender gap in technology is crucial.


By Matt Weber 09/13/2017 8:34 AM EDT
Dan Koretz

In this special video edition of the Harvard EdCast, Professor Daniel Koretz discusses his new book, "The Testing Charade," and evaluates why testing policy over the last several decades is just not working — for kids or for schools.


By Matt Weber 08/31/2017 3:38 PM EDT
Prison

Non-incarcerated instructor Erin Castro penned an article in the Harvard Ed Review with an unusual collaborator — her incarcerated student Michael Brawn.


By Jill Anderson 08/28/2017 8:31 AM EDT
Jeff Perrotti

Jeff Perrotti, C.A.S.'85, director of the Safe Schools Program for LGBTQ Students, highlights ways in which schools can better address the needs of transgender youth.


By Matt Weber 08/17/2017 2:12 PM EDT
School Hallway

John Merrow, Ed.D.'73, former education correspondent for the <em>PBS NewsHour</em>, shares insights from his new book <em>Addicted to Reform: A 12-Step Program to Rescue Public Education</em>.


By Iman Rastegari 08/08/2017 7:43 AM EDT
Paths

Helen Janc Malone, Ed.M.'07, Ed.D.’13, and Santiago Rincón-Gallardo, Ed.M.’07, Ed.D.’13, discuss trends reshaping the field of education.


By Iman Rastegari 06/29/2017 4:08 PM EDT
Laptop

Test prep isn't what it used to be. With technological advances, gone are the days of poring over a three-inch thick manual and filling out Scantron bubbles on sample test sheet after sample test sheet. Now, companies like Kaplan Test Prep offer a…


By Matt Weber 06/20/2017 4:45 PM EDT
Newark School

Christopher Cerf came to Newark in 2015 ready to work. The public schools in the city had faced a number of tumultuous years — even becoming state-operated in 1995 — but, if the low graduation rates and test scores, and low percentage of students…


By Matt Weber 06/15/2017 10:23 AM EDT
New Report Finds Young People Troubled By Romantic Relationships and Widespread Sexual Harassment

Navigating the road to adulthood — especially in regard to sex and relationships — is difficult for even the most self-assured kid. What can make things even worse for young people is the general feeling that everyone around you is hooking up.…


By Jill Anderson 06/08/2017 2:20 PM EDT
Lyn Mikel Brown

Being empowered is different than projecting an image of empowerment for girls, says Colby College Professor Lyn Mikel Brown, Ed.D.'89, author of Powered by Girl: A Field Guide to Supporting Youth Activists. But to get there may be easier said than…


By Matt Weber 05/31/2017 2:41 PM EDT
Green Mountain Education

School districts in the state of Vermont range from small (4,000 students in the district) to smaller (15 students in the most rural of schools), but one thing that looms large in each community is its schools."These schools are really at the heart…


By Jill Anderson 05/10/2017 1:23 PM EDT
Schools that Succeed

When author Karin Chenoweth began to investigate what goes in to making a school successful, she looked at a rather unexpected place: schools in low-income communties that, despite their lack of resources and supports, were showing impressive levels…


By Jill Anderson 05/03/2017 2:11 PM EDT
Boys to Men

From an early age, boys are shown that they need to possess strength, toughness, stoicism, and other stereotypically "masculine" traits in order to become men. Many even feel, says Mark Tappan, Ed.D.'87, a professor at Colby College and an expert on…


By Matt Weber 04/26/2017 3:37 PM EDT
Tommy Chang, courtesy of Boston Globe

When, almost two years ago, Tommy Chang took on the role of superintendent of Boston Public Schools, he did so with the hope that he would be able to build on the successes of his predessors to increase equity, innovation, and family partnerships.…


By Jill Anderson 04/19/2017 2:47 PM EDT
A Life Animated by Autism

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind always had felt compelled to find and tell the stories of individuals around the world who had been discarded by society's norms. But it wasn't until decades into his career that he began to understand…


By Jill Anderson 04/12/2017 10:20 AM EDT
Sit with Us

As a seventh- and eight-grader, Natalie Hampton — now 16 — experienced what she calls "horrific" bullying. She was cyberbullied, verbally taunted, and physically attacked, but the thing that always felt the worst to her was having to eat lunch…


By Matt Weber 04/05/2017 2:18 PM EDT
James Ryan

What are the five essential questions in life? In this special video edition of the Harvard EdCast and in an appearance on CBS This Morning, Dean James Ryan speaks about his new book, Wait, What? Based on his wildly popular commencement address, this…


By Jill Anderson 03/29/2017 4:31 PM EDT
Keeping the DREAM Alive

While a doctoral student at Arizona State University (ASU), Jesus Cisneros was struck by the lack of visible supports in place for undocumented students in the higher education setting. Especially surprising was that this was Arizona, as he calls it,…


By Jill Anderson 03/22/2017 12:33 PM EDT
Anne Holton

What will public education look like in the United States in the near future? Former Virginia Secretary of Education Anne Holton — lawyer, judge, onetime First Lady of Virginia, and longtime advocate for children and families — knows that the…


By Matt Weber 03/15/2017 10:40 AM EDT
Walking Around the World

In 2013, Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist Paul Salopek set out on a 21,000-mile journey to retrace the first human diaspora — from Ethiopia to Chile — on foot. Salopek calls this a "storytelling experiment," one he hoped would both slow things…


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