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Stephanie M. Jones

Marie and Max Kargman Associate Professor in Human Development and Urban Education Advancement
Stephanie M. Jones

Degree:  Ph.D., Yale University, (2002)
Email:  [javascript protected email address]
Phone:  617.496.2223
Vitae/CV:   Stephanie M. Jones.pdf
Office:  Larsen 702
Office Hours Contact:  Email the Faculty Member and cc the Faculty Assistant
Faculty Assistant:  Jonathan Whichard

Profile

Stephanie Jones is the Marie and Max Kargman Associate Professor in Human Development and Urban Education. Her research, anchored in prevention science, focuses on the effects of poverty and exposure to violence on children and youth's social, emotional, and behavioral development. Over the last ten years her work has focused on both evaluation research addressing the impact of preschool and elementary focused social-emotional learning interventions on behavioral and academic outcomes and classroom practices; as well as new curriculum development, implementation, and testing. Jones is a recipient of the Grawemeyer Award in Education for her work with Zigler and Walter Gilliam on A Vision for Universal Preschool Education (Cambridge University Press, 2006) and a recipient of the Joseph E. Zins Early-Career Distinguished Contribution Award for Action Research in Social and Emotional Learning. Jones' research portfolio emphasizes the importance of conducting rigorous scientific research, including program evaluation, that also results in accessible content for early and middle childhood practitioners and policymakers. Her developmental and experimental research investigates the causes and consequences of social-emotional problems and competencies; strategies for altering the pathways that shape children's social-emotional development; and programs, interventions, and pedagogy that foster social-emotional competencies among children, adults, and environments. Her policy-driven research with colleague Nonie Lesaux focuses on the challenge of simultaneously expanding and improving the quality of early childhood education, at scale (The Leading Edge of Early Childhood Education, Harvard Education Press, 2016). Jones serves on numerous national advisory boards and expert consultant groups related to social-emotional development and child and family anti-poverty policies, including the National Boards of Parents as Teachers and Engaging Schools. She consults to program developers, including Sesame Street, and has conducted numerous evaluations of programs and early education efforts, including Reading, Writing, Respect and Resolution, Resolving Conflict Creatively, SECURe, and the Head Start CARES initiative. Across projects and initiatives, Jones maintains a commitment to supporting the alignment of preK-3 curricula and instructional practices.

Click here to see a full list of Stephanie Jones' courses.

Sponsored Projects


What's Fair for Teachers and Students: Impacts of Within-Classroom Heterogeneity and Ability-grouping on Teacher Practice and Student Achievement (2017-2018)
Spencer Foundation

With increasingly rigorous teacher evaluation policy, teachers’ classroom instruction isfrequently observed and evaluated, and teachers are held accountable for their students’ achievement gains. One of the primary challenges in assessing quality of classroom teaching practice is that it likely varies a great deal according to the level and heterogeneity of the academic competence of the students. Since Jeannie Oakes’s seminal work (1985), much research has shown how schools exacerbate inequality by tracking students. However, few studies have directly assessed its effect on teaching practice, nor used methods that permit causal interpretations of the impacts of ability-grouping on student outcomes.

Utilizing data from the Measures for Effective Teaching project, we propose to test the impacts of ability grouping on observed teaching practice and student achievement gains. Using inverse-probability weighted regression adjustment technique, this study will compare the quality of teaching practice and student achievement gains in classrooms with high (heterogeneous) and low (ability-grouped) academic heterogeneity. The findings about the impacts of student grouping on teaching quality and student achievement gains will inform the improvement of measures of teaching effectiveness for fair and accurate assessment of teaching quality, and assist decisions about school classroom grouping policy and resource allocation.


The Taxonomy Project – Proposal to Bring the Field Along (2016-2017)
William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

A strong body of research shows that “non-cognitive” skills are important to children’s success in school and in life, but current national discussion of the domain is beset by dilemmas about how best to measure and promote skills in this area. Dr. Jones and her research team propose to conduct a series of activities that will generate field-wide consensus and buy-in for the Taxonomy Project, a research project that seeks to develop a coherent taxonomy of non-cognitive skills that organizes, describes, and connects them across disciplines in a way that is agnostic to brand and sensitive to development and context. Our consensus building work will advance the Education Program’s strategic goals by strengthening and generating buy-in around a set of open-source tools that can be used by funders, researchers, educators, and policymakers to identify and align skills, strategies, and assessments across disciplines in ways that enable them to make informed decisions about standards and strategies for K-12 student success.


The Taxonomy Project – Proposal to Bring the Field Along (2016-2017)
Wallace Foundation

A strong body of research shows that “non-cognitive” skills are important to children’s success in school and in life, but current national discussion of the domain is beset by dilemmas about how best to measure and promote skills in this area. Dr. Jones and her research team propose to conduct a series of activities that will generate field-wide consensus and buy-in for the Taxonomy Project, a research project that seeks to develop a coherent taxonomy of non-cognitive skills that organizes, describes, and connects them across disciplines in a way that is agnostic to brand and sensitive to development and context. Our consensus building work will advance the Education Program’s strategic goals by strengthening and generating buy-in around a set of open-source tools that can be used by funders, researchers, educators, and policymakers to identify and align skills, strategies, and assessments across disciplines in ways that enable them to make informed decisions about standards and strategies for K-12 student success.


A Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Lions Quest Skills for Adolescence in Two Middle Schools (2016-2018)
Lions Club International Foundation

We will conduct a two-year longitudinal, quasi-experimental design to evaluate the impact of Lions Quest SFA on student-, classroom-, and school-level outcomes in two middle schools in the Central Islip School District of Long Island, New York.

The plan study builds on prior evaluations of Lions Quest programs (e.g., Kidron, Garibaldi & Osher, 2014). As such, we expect it to provide important information about the replicability of findings across schools and school-districts, however in focusing on the recently revised Lions Quest Skills for Adolescence, the project will add new findings to the body of evidence for SEL programs overall, and for Lions Quest in particular.


Alignment, Codification, and Performance Management related to Achievement First Bridgeport Academy's Character Development Work (2016-2017)
Tauck Family Foundation

The overall goal of this extension of our existing work in partnership with TFF and Achievement First Bridgeport Academy (AFBA) is to continue and expand our work in Bridgeport focusing in several keys areas:
(1) building knowledge about (a) children’s emerging skills and areas of challenge in the social-emotional domain and why these skills are critical to school success, and (b) the ways in which adult stress and skills in the social-emotional domain can impede or foster children’s social-emotional skill development;
(2) identifying, deploying, and evaluating strategies to build adult and child skills in social-emotional learning with an emphasis on the Tauck Family Foundation’s (TFF) five essential SEL skills; and
(3) developing and testing a performance management system for SEL that (a) guides the identification of strategies, (b) provides a mechanism for ongoing progress monitoring, feedback, and changes to practice, and (c) serves as an anchor point for ongoing coaching and support in using SEL strategies.

A broad goal of this work is to generate a framework and kit of SEL-focused strategies (along with embedded performance management tools) for elementary schools and other learning settings. This is likely to include “prototypical” or emblematic strategies for major domains of SEL development in different grades/stages (e.g., focus on EF/cognitive regulation and related strategies in the younger grades, and on more complex forms of planning/goal setting and social problem solving in the older grades). We also expect the work to include parallel strategies and practices for adults – teachers and parents – that build directly from the SECURe Families and Professional Development systems, and that focus primarily on adult stress.


SEL Analysis Project (2016-2017)
Wallace Foundation

Over the past 10-15 years, emerging research in neuroscience and prevention science has changed the way that scientists understand social and emotional learning. There is growing consensus among researchers who study child development, education, and health that these skills are essential to learning and life outcomes. Furthermore, research indicates that high-quality, evidence-based programs and policies that promote social and emotional skills among students can improve academic achievement as well as positive behavior, physical and mental wellbeing, college and career readiness, and economic productivity.

In February 2016, we submitted a non-public report to the Wallace Foundation that summarized findings from a detailed analysis of 15 leading social and emotional learning programs intended for use with elementary-aged children. The purpose of the report is to support grantees of the Wallace Foundation to better select and adapt SEL programs to fit the needs of their organizations. The focus of the analysis was on (a) identifying key features and attributes of SEL programming for elementary-school-aged children, and (b) making general comparisons across varying program approaches.

Our initial analysis of the data in the report suggests there exist many opportunities to expand upon, explore, and present the information we gathered in ways that empower practitioners to make informed choices about SEL programming. We propose parsing the information in the report into a series of smaller, more easily navigable public documents that will be useful to stakeholders from various communities, including schools, districts, OST organizations, program developers, researchers, and policy-makers.


SEL Analysis Project (2016-2017)
Wallace Foundation

Over the past 10-15 years, emerging research in neuroscience and prevention science has changed the way that scientists understand social and emotional learning. There is growing consensus among researchers who study child development, education, and health that these skills are essential to learning and life outcomes. Furthermore, research indicates that high-quality, evidence-based programs and policies that promote social and emotional skills among students can improve academic achievement as well as positive behavior, physical and mental wellbeing, college and career readiness, and economic productivity.

In February 2016, we submitted a non-public report to the Wallace Foundation that summarized findings from a detailed analysis of 15 leading social and emotional learning programs intended for use with elementary-aged children. The purpose of the report is to support grantees of the Wallace Foundation to better select and adapt SEL programs to fit the needs of their organizations. The focus of the analysis was on (a) identifying key features and attributes of SEL programming for elementary-school-aged children, and (b) making general comparisons across varying program approaches.

Our initial analysis of the data in the report suggests there exist many opportunities to expand upon, explore, and present the information we gathered in ways that empower practitioners to make informed choices about SEL programming. We propose parsing the information in the report into a series of smaller, more easily navigable public documents that will be useful to stakeholders from various communities, including schools, districts, OST organizations, program developers, researchers, and policy-makers. Here we outline the major components of a process to refine and convert the larger non-public report into a series of smaller public reports and/or briefs intended to practically benefit the field of social and emotional learning. The project is divided into four phases over the course of one year, each with its own set of associated public documents.
•Comprehensive Guide to Selecting High-Quality SEL Programs
•Interactive, Online Guide
•Report on “Kernels of Practice” – Key Strategies and Routines Used Across High-Quality SEL Programs
• Brief on Key Principles and Strategies to Support SEL
•Brief on Common Challenges for SEL Implementation
•Report on Adapting SEL Programs/Strategies for OST Settings


The Taxonomy Project: Non-Cognitive Skills for Learning and Life Success (2016-2017)
Einhorn Family Charitable Trust

In its history, the field of social-emotional learning (SEL) has been defined or characterized in a variety of ways. In some respects, the term “social and emotional learning” serves as an umbrella for many subfields with which many educators, researchers, and policy-makers are familiar (e.g., bullying prevention, civic and character education and development, conflict resolution, social skills training, life skills, “soft” or “non-cognitive” skills, 21st century skills). However, the national discussion of this domain lacks clarity about what we mean and is beset by dilemmas about how best to measure and promote skills in this area. Underlying this challenge, and in some ways compounding it, is the fact that the field more generally is structured around a large number of organizational systems or frameworks.

While such diversity has a powerfully positive influence on the field, it makes it challenging to find common ground on topics that are universally relevant, such as scaling effective practices, or building and deploying assessments. Inevitably, conversations about practices, assessment, and other related areas begin with, “What are the practices designed to change?” “What should we be assessing?” “What
framework should we use to guide our work?”

The field needs a platform that showcases the points of alignment and divergence across frameworks and does so in a way that enables those doing the work of the field to both identify common ground and to see what is distinct within any particular framework. Over the last six months our team has developed a system and a structure that allows us to do this and to do it using a compelling user interface.

Key products from this work include the online thesaurus and interactive tools as well as a report
and set of related short field-facing briefs that (1) describe the system and our process for building
it, (2) highlight key findings from our work, showcasing similarities, differences and areas for
growth, and (3) outlines opportunities and next steps for using such a system to advance the field.


Mapping Executive Function: Translating Research Evidence for Application (2015-2017)
ACF / Child Care Bureau


The Taxonomy Project: Non-Cognitive Skills for Learning and Life Success (2015-2017)
Einhorn Family Charitable Trust

Two projects are funded under the grant from the Einhorn Foundation:

Project 1: The Taxonomy Project: “Non-Cognitive” Skills for Learning and Life Success

The Taxonomy Project will focus on three tasks:

Task 1: Describe and integrate existing frameworks in the broad non-cognitive domain; including key terms/skills arising from multiple research disciplines and diverse approaches to measuring and defining skills .

Task 2: Create a structure for an applied developmental taxonomy that integrates concepts from multiple frameworks, describes in terms of everyday observable behaviors, and emphasizes how it changes across development); plus an illustration of how stakeholders can use the taxonomy to enhance their work in research, policy, or practice with children and youth.

Task 3: Build a multi–year proposal for continued funding and a list of funding opportunities that are aligned to project scope, goals and activities.

Project 2: Kernels of Practice for SEL: Evidence-Based Strategies for Social, Emotional, and Ethical Development

In recent decades many school based programs have focused not only on academics but on an inter-related set of skills that fall under the headings of social and emotional learning (SEL), character education, bullying prevention, life skills, and/or youth development. Among these approaches, those focused on SEL appear to have the largest and most rigorously evaluated evidence base. SEL programming, which typically includes professional development, coaching, instructional lessons, skill-building routines, and skills practice, have been shown to improve the culture and climate of schools and classrooms and children’s social, emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes (e.g., Durlak, Weissberg, Dymnicki, et al., 2011; Humphrey, 2013; Jones et al., 2011)

Schools need a continuum of approaches that includes not only comprehensive, universal SEL curricula, but also routines and structures school staff and students use daily, as well as regular activities and school-wide efforts to promote respectful culture (Jones & Bouffard, 2012). There is now a pressing need to develop, test, and scale less intensive strategies that are easy to implement outside the context of a comprehensive program while still achieving meaningful outcomes for students. Teachers, staff, and administrators in all schools need access to evidence-based strategies and activities they can use with students in fairly brief but ongoing ways, and that are tailored to the school’s unique context, needs, capacities, and target goals. This investigation will outline the major components of the first phase of a larger project designed to build and test a body of evidence-based strategies and practices that can ultimately be adopted by a broad range of elementary, middle and high schools. The first phase is focused on building and piloting a limited number of evidence-based kernel of practice for SEL.


Linking Science to Policy for a New Generation of Pre-K: Convening and Guidance for Leaders (2014-2015)
Foundation for Child Development

The proposed project will initiate a strategic collaboration across sectors and disciplines, linking science and policy for a new generation of Pre-K. This effort will focus on convening, cultivating relationships, and communication, ultimately steering public policies and initiatives that significantly improve the quality of early learning environments as well as expand their reach. Specifically, this project has two key elements: (1) a one-day convening (12/12/14) that forges relationships among influential leaders and scholars in the early education field, where they engage in mutual learning and dialogue around the goal of creating actionable knowledge around issues central to advancing early learning for all; and (2) a multi-pronged communication strategy, rooted in the convening and designed to provide guidance to the field, that includes: an edited volume to serve as guidance for the field, especially decision-makers; a series of one-page translational briefs to support strategy and decision-making around PreK; webinars for practitioners; a 3-year plan for a series of follow-on institutes to build and enhance capacity among leaders and practitioners. The primary target audience is deliberately broad, including, for example: state- and federal- policymakers; education leaders; early education center directors; practitioners serving in formal or informal leadership roles; funders and non-profit leaders working in the early education sector; faculty and graduate students. This grant will facilitate both the convening and the communication strategies.


Linking Science to Policy for a New Generation of Pre-K: Convening and Guidance for Leaders (2014-2015)
Irene E. & George A. Davis Foundation

The project initiates a strategic collaboration focused on Pre-K improvement and expansion, linking science and policy for a new generation of early education. This effort focuses on cultivating relationships among Hampden County's early education stakeholders and leaders in the early education field from across the nation. Ultimately, the outcome of this convening includes actionable policy guidance for Hampden County, Massachusetts, and the nation--guidance to inform improvements to the quality of early learning environments as well as to inform expansion efforts. Specifically, this project has two key elements: (1) a one-day convening (12/12/14) that forges relationships among stakeholders in Hampden County's early education field with influential leaders and experts from across the nation, where they engage in mutual learning and dialogue around the goal of strengthening individual and organization capacities to advance early learning for all; and (2) a multi-pronged communication strategy, rooted in the convening and designed to provide guidance around the field's most pressing needs, with a particular focus on strengthening the quality of Pre-K for at-risk children, like many of those growing up Hampden County. Specifically, this multi-pronged communication strategy includes: an edited volume to serve as guidance for the field, especially decision-makers at the local level; a series of one-page translational briefs to support strategy and decision-making around Pre-K; webinars (aligned to the convening's major topics) for practitioners; a 3-year plan for a series of follow-on institutes to build and enhance capacity among leaders and practitioners in early education. Team researchers expect organizations and individuals from across Hampden County to be primary participants in these follow-on institutes. The target audience for this project is deliberately broad, including, for example: state- and federal- policymakers; education leaders (e.g., superintendents, assistant superintendents, etc.); early education center directors; practitioners serving in formal or informal leadership roles (e.g., head teachers, pre-school teachers, department heads); funders and non-profit leaders working in the early education sector; faculty and graduate students. This grant facilitates both elements of the project--the convening and the communication strategy for impact.


SECURe PAC: SECURe for Parents and Children (2014-2015)
Aspen Institute

Working in close collaboration with school- and community-based partners, a team of researchers and program developers at Harvard University is developing, implementing, and evaluating a dual-generation program that supports low-income children’s academic and social- emotional development while simultaneously building skills and social capital among low- income parents. The project involves a combination of targeted school readiness activities for children, as well as adult-focused programming designed to address specific challenges faced by low-income parents. By enhancing the skills and capacities of children and parents together, the goal is to move families toward an inter-generational cycle of opportunity, health, and academic and economic success.

The research team is extending an existing evidence-based, teacher- and child-focused curricular intervention that targets self-regulation and executive function skills in PreK - 3rd grade classrooms, called “SECURe: Social, Emotional, and Cognitive Understanding and Regulation in education.” The dual-generation program includes new parent- focused strategies that are aligned with SECURe concepts and that build knowledge, skills, and social support among low-income adults. The adult intervention will be delivered through mental health consultation and parent groups, and will use parenting as a platform for addressing a broader set of issues related to workplace skills and economic stability, such as planning, goal- setting, coping with stress, and managing personal and professional relationships. The expectation is that the resulting intervention, titled “SECURe for Parents and Children (SECURe PAC)” is feasible to implement within existing school- and community-based services in urban areas with a high concentration of families and children living in poverty. The project seeks to capitalize on a growing body of literature that indicates executive function, self-regulation, and toxic stress are key levers of change for improving outcomes for low-income children and families. It is well documented that children and families living in poverty face a number of stressors and risks that impact their healthy development and well-being. Recent research and theory suggest that executive function and self-regulation may play a central role in moderating or mediating the impacts of poverty-related stressors and risks on a number of important outcomes across learning, behavior, and health. There is an urgent need for the development of new evidence-based, dual- generation approaches that can be implemented to directly impact both child and parent well- being through the mechanism of improved executive function and self-regulation skills.

The SECURe PAC project is designed to support positive outcomes for low-income children and families in the following ways: (a) by increasing the documented positive impacts of the SECURe school-based program through a set of home-based strategies for parents and caregivers to use across preschool and the early school years; and (b) by establishing a parent-focused component that increases social capital and peer support among families, while addressing specific needs of low-income adults through mental health consultation and skill development. Evidence suggests that children’s academic and social-emotional outcomes improve when adults collaborate across home and school environments to provide consistent, reliable, high-quality learning experiences, particularly during key developmental transitions. While some resources exist to align home and school practices, the majority of these resources do not provide direct services to adults to address the barriers that low-income parents face in their own personal and professional lives, which may influence parents’ capacity for engagement as well as overall family well-being. The project aims to address both of these issues simultaneously in order to maximize the impact of the SECURe program.


Impact Evaluation of Multi-tiered Systems of Support for Behavior (2013-2018)
Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation

The principal investigator has been closely involved in the preparation of the MDRC and American Institutes for Research (AIR) response to Solicitation Number ED-IES-13-R-0035, Impact Evaluation of Training in School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SWPBS). Jones co-leads or leads several randomized evaluations of preschool and elementary school interventions in social-emotional learning and conflict resolution. As part of the research team, she collaborates with project management team members and serves as Task Leader on the measurement task. In addition, Jones participates in the implementation and impact team work streams and assists in site recruitment and with the selection of training providers.


Making Caring Common Project (2013-2017)
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The Making Caring Common Initiative at the Harvard Graduate School of Education seeks to place moral and social development at the center of conversations about raising and educating children, and seeks to strengthen the ability of schools, parents, and communities to support the development of children’s ethical and social capacities, including the ability to take responsibility for others, to think clearly about and pursue justice, and to treat people well day to day.

Our four year plan features two mutually reinforcing types of work: (1) development of a media and messaging strategy and campaign, and (2) development of interventions and resources for schools and parents and a school innovation network. We are piloting and implementing new resources, interventions, and strategies that enable us to apply our messages in homes, schools, and other settings, as well as gather information that will help us further refine and develop our media messages.


Continuing Development of SECURe with the Children's Aid Society of New York (2013-2015)
Children's Aid Society

The SECURe team at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, led by Stephanie Jones in conjunction with Robin Jacob of the University of Michigan continues to develop and support a customized version of the SECURe program specifically for use by The Children’s Aid Society. Harvard develops a customized version of the SECURe program for grades K-2 at Children’s Aid College Prep Charter school, provides professional development and training, and offers targeted programmatic implementation and evaluation support for The Children’s Aid Society. This project aims to:

1. Expand training opportunities for all CACPCS staff.

2. Enhance and differentiate curriculum to create a developmentally differentiated version of the curriculum for grades K-2.
3. Create a professional development training manual and scope and sequence that allows for additional, more intentional, and more comprehensive training for all CACPCS staff.
4. Implement comprehensive, research-based assessments that increases school stakeholder knowledge of students’ skill development and the impact of SECURe.
5. Extend and increase embedded coaching for all staff by providing on-site coaching for CACPCS, including Life Coaches.
6. Support other applications of SECURe by working with CAS and CACPCS to seek funding and other support related to the application and extension of SECURe to new school and home contexts including:
a. Summer and Afterschool sites: SECURe works with CAS to pursue additional funding opportunities related to the extension of SECURe to afterschool and summer site locations.
b. Development of the SECURe Parent/Family Connection Component: SECURe works with CAS to pursue additional funding opportunities related to developing a SECURe Family Connection Component.


Drawing on the Advances in Science to Drive Innovation in Early Childhood Policy and Practice (2013-2014)
Barr Foundation

Early education and care (EEC) providers play an essential role in facilitating young children’s development. As a result, early childhood quality improvement efforts often include attention to educator competencies such as instruction and relationship quality. Yet, these efforts have placed little emphasis on an essential set of skills – EEC providers’ capacities for social, emotional, and cognitive regulation. These skills, including stress management, coping and emotional regulation, and relationship-building, influence educators’ instructional and classroom practices and therefore children’s outcomes.
Self-regulatory skills are needed by everyone who works with young children, and early childhood educators have stressful jobs under the best of conditions. But this stress
is magnified in vulnerable communities, because young children living with the adversities of poverty exhibit more behavior problems, on average, than their peers (Evans et al.,2004; Gunnar, 2000). In these same settings, early childhood educators often face significant personal stresses. For example, research has found moderate to high rates of depression among Head Start staff (HHS/ACF/OPRE, 2006) and 61% of full-time early childhood staff earn roughly the equivalent of the poverty level income for a family of four (U.S. GAO, 2012).
It is not surprising, then, that high rates of off-task behavior and cycles of negative interactions among adults and children are common in EEC settings in disadvantaged communities (Raver, 2004). In such circumstances, a negative feedback loop can emerge in which stressed, dysregulated children and chaotic environments strain EEC providers, interrupting their interactions with children and hindering their ability to manage behavior, cope with challenges, and provide high quality instruction. This cycle may help to explain alarmingly high rates of behavior problems and even expulsions among preschoolers and kindergarteners (Gilliam, 2005; Gilliam & Shahar, 2006).
To break this cycle, this project aims to build EEC providers’ self-regulatory skills, including emotional regulation, stress management, executive functioning, and ability to communicate calmly and warmly with children, in order to support the high quality interactions and skill modeling that support children’s self-regulation.
An intervention in which project staff work with EEC providers at one Boston site to help them understand and work toward strong self-regulation will be developed and implemented. The intervention will include reflective exercises, discussion, case studies, video, and other interactive strategies that have been shown to be effective.
An intervention focused on providers’ self-regulation could improve the learning environment through a two-fold process: first, by increasing providers' awareness of their own reactions to stressors, and second, by strengthening their abilities to manage their classrooms and develop students’ own self-regulatory capacities. The expected result is that EEC providers’ improved self-regulation will affect individual students and also the overall classroom climate, or the dynamic relationships among students, teachers, and peers (Pianta & Hamre, 2009), such that an entire classroom of students could be shifted toward cycles of greater self-regulation.
To build EEC providers’ self-regulatory capacity, several opportunities within the EEC setting will be harnessed. These include providers’ deep knowledge from the field, the chance to get ongoing feedback and input from providers, and the chance to develop and test new strategies in real time.


Getting Ready for School: An Integrated Curriculum to Help Teachers and Parents support preschool children’s early literacy, math and self-regulation skills (2013-2014)
Columbia University/Department of Education

The SECURe Project Manager supports the Getting Ready for School (GRS) project in the following ways:
• Develops a set of 8-12 new SECURe Pre-K Brain Games to be included in the GRS Program
• Reviews all GRS planning materials and curricula
• Makes recommendations for specific ways to integrate self-regulation in each GRS Unit (Math Activities, Literacy Activities, and Daily/Weekly Classroom Routines)
• Identifies a set of SECURe Structures and Routines to be included in the GRS program
• Identifies a set of SECURe Pre-K Lessons to be included in each GRS Unit
• Develops and leads a SECURe “Train the Trainers” for GRS Team Members
• Participates in conference calls with GRS Team Members
• Collaborates with GRS Team Members on specific tasks
• Consults on questions related to self-regulation, social-emotional development, and curriculum development and implementation


School Strategies to Accompany the Bully DVD (2012-2013)
Bully Movie Outreach, Inc.

This project consists of three phases:

Phase 1: Generate a set of 5-6 “big idea” strategies for teachers and other school staff to use to prevent and respond to bullying. These strategies will be informed by research and developmental theory and will be grounded in practical experience. Each strategy will include 4-5 concrete, low-burden steps for schools (#1 what to do first; #2 what to do next; #3 steps toward long-term change). Where appropriate, these strategies will also include links to useful resources.

Phase 2: Develop website materials that support the strategies. The materials include concrete, accessible guidance to schools about how to implement these strategies effectively, including what obstacles they are likely to face and how to overcome them. We also provide the rationale and research-base for each of the 5-6 strategies.

Phase 3: Decision is made by The Bully Project (TBP) & Harvard regarding best placement of materials on website(s) – Harvard site, BULLY Site, or both.


School Reform and Beyond: Pre-K to 1st grade (2011-2013)
NIH

As one of two PrincipalInvestigators, Raver will oversee the subaward to New York University. Raver's tasks and activities over the course of the study will include collaborating with Jones In the design, sampling and measurement components of the study.This Includes recommendations, review, and rationale for site selection and completion of measurement protocols, review of the design and Implementation of classroom curricular components,instructional strategies, teacher training/workforce development, and the approach to be used for monitoring of Intervention fidelity of Implementation. Raver will participate In monthly (by phone) and quarterly (by teleconference} meetings to review collection, analysis, and write-up of raw data generated In Years 1 and 2 of the project. hi addition, Raver will collaborate on drafting, review, and submission of one or more reports and papers as part of the project's dissemination effort. •


Pre-K-3rd Implementation and Evaluation Framework Project (2011-2012)
W. Clement & Jessie V. Stone Foundation

This 24-month project (July 2010-June 2012 ) will develop a PreK-3rd Implementation and Evaluation Framework. All good evaluation tools are also
good planning tools. As such, the Framework will be a useful guide for those engaged in the development, planning, and evaluation of PreK-3rd grade
efforts. The research-based Framework will be a significant contribution to the field. It will not only provide a user-friendly and meaningful Framework
for understanding the depth, breadth, and quality of PreK-3rd approaches, but will also establish the foundation upon which PreK-3rd grade evaluations
can be conceptualized and designed.
The Framework will be designed primarily for use by schools and school districts and will be based on the premise that there is no one “right” way to
build or evaluate PreK-3rd efforts. The approach to building a PreK-3rd system depends on a school district’s or school’s resources, leadership,
population, needs, and strengths. From an implementation perspective, the Framework will help users see the “big picture” of comprehensive and
systemic PreK-3rd work. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, the Framework will guide users in understanding how their own PreK-3rd
strategies “fit” in the big picture, providing concrete examples of how they can enrich and expand their PreK-3rd efforts.


Restricted Follow-up Support on the Integrating Early Childhood and Elementary Education (2011-2012)
W. Clement & Jessie V. Stone Foundation

Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) sought funding for a third PreK-3rd Institute, the subsequent follow-up work, and evaluation. The goal is to foster the development of successful PreK-3rd initiatives across the United States by bringing a second cohort of PreK-3rd teams for a 2010 Institute and providing follow-up support to participating sites. The specific objectives are to: [1] finalize the recruitment of a new cohort of PreK-3rd teams; [2] design and implement the PreK-3rd Institute; [3] support participating sites in carrying out the action plans; and [4] monitor and evaluate the implementation of the action plan.


Testing CSRP's Impact on Low-income Children's Outcomes in 3rd-5th Grade: A 5-year Follow-up (2009-2014)
National Institute for Child Health and Human Development

Poverty-related risks may seriously jeopardize low-income children’s opportunities for learning inschool contexts. As many as 23% of low-income children in urban communities such as Chicago exhibithigh levels of behavioral problems prior to school entry, and 24% of children enrolled in Chicago’s publicschools are at academic risk by 3rd grade (Li-Grining, Votruba-Drzal, Bachman, & Chase-Lansdale, 2006;Raver, 2002). Young children appear to be substantially underserved by community mental health services,with less than 1% of children receiving services prior to school entry (Yoshikawa & Knitzer, 1997). A centralaim of the proposed plan of research is to examine the long-term impact of a classroom-based interventiondesigned to address these poverty-related disparities. This proposed plan of research seeks renewal ofsupport for a project initially entitled “Emotions Matter” (renamed the Chicago School Readiness Project, orCSRP). The project was initially funded from 2003-2008 by the Inter-Agency Consortium on SchoolReadiness.

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