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Ed Magazine Winter 2010

Ethan Gray

Ethan Gray, Ed.M.'07, is a new Hoosier with big plans.

Alum Ethan Gray's interest in education reform led him to The Mind Trust, an organization, as he says, "dedicated to dramatically improving public education for underserved students by empowering education entrepreneurs..."

Leanna Marr

LeAnna Marr, Ed.M.'03, is perpetually jet lagged.

Alum LeAnna Marr's work with US Aid focuses on national policy and educational reform in countries where the U.S. government provides foreign assistance.

Laura Lees

Laura Lees, Ed.M.'01, is wondering what to say next.

Alum Laura Lees' commitment to her students and her profession was rewarded recently when she was honored with the University of Hawaii's Regents' Medal for Excellence in Teaching, an award for which she was nominated by her colleagues and students.

Christine Renaud

One on One with Christine Renaud

Alum Christine Renaud's learning continues as CEO and cofounder of E-180, a website, blog, and soon-to-be mentoring portal, where anyone seeking to expand their learning without formality can be matched with a mentor on any topic for free.

Illustration, person hopping stacks of books

Repetition, Repetition, Repetition

SpacedEd, a new online learning site, utilizes the benefits of spaced education, a patented methodology developed by B. Price Kerfoot, Ed.M.'00, after years of research and trials on his medical colleagues.

Illustration, broken window

A to B: Why I Got into Education

I bought my first science project on the school bus for five bucks when I was in 10th grade. I bought it from an 11th-grader after the school science fair ended.

Susan Johnson

On PAR

New teachers and experienced teachers. In some ways, they are at the opposite ends of the teaching spectrum. However, both can, and do, struggle. Who better to guide them than other teachers?

Jeannette Mancilla-Martinez

The Family Way

Pregnant at 15, Jeannette Mancilla-Martinez could easily have dropped out of high school and become another tragic statistic. But she always had her eye on the future.