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Teacher Education Program

The Teacher Education Program prepares students to become transformative teacher-leaders in America’s urban public schools.

What is a teacher-leader? A teacher-leader is a high-school math teacher who trains her colleagues in data analysis so they can identify trends in test scores. It’s a middle-school social studies teacher who partners with Facing History and Ourselves to design an immersive school-wide curriculum on civil rights. It’s a biology teacher with the vision and leadership skills to influence the success of the entire school from his classroom. 

In the Teacher Education Program (TEP), we believe in the power of teacher-leaders to be agents of organizational and social change, transforming urban public schools and improving lives.

America’s urban public middle schools and high schools need teachers who know how to adapt a lesson plan to English language learners (ELL); who recognize the relationship between race, class, and power in the urban classroom; who incorporate research-backed methodologies into their teaching practice; and who are reflective and purposeful in their teaching, continually adjusting their practice to reach the most marginalized students. In TEP, you will learn how to become the kind of teacher who makes a real and lasting impact in the lives of your students.

Message from the Director

Welcome to the website of the Harvard Teacher Education Program! On behalf of the faculty, staff and students at Harvard, I am very pleased that you are considering the role of teachers in shaping and contributing to the future of our society.

The impact of your decision to become a teacher – whether for 2 years or 20 – can be measured by considering the following:
Children represent 20% of the population of the United States and yet they are 100% of our future. What could be more important? Why not use your energy and passion to help shape the future?

The need for teachers, particularly those in urban areas, has never been greater. Talking to a middle school youngster about science or working with a high school senior on a college essay can be a life changing experience – both for you, the teacher, and for your student. Come to Harvard where you will receive a first class education in the content, skills and approaches necessary to be highly effective in the classroom. Attend classes in your subject area with outstanding scholars, work in urban schools on the cutting edge of reform. Explore Boston and New England all while receiving a Master’s degree from one of the best universities in the world.

Please read more about our exemplary program on this website and contact us with any questions you may have.

Are you up for the challenge? Think about it. Nothing could be more important!

DARE TO TEACH AND SHAPE THE FUTURE!!

Katherine K. Merseth
Program Director, Teacher Education Program
Senior Lecturer on Education

Program Highlights

Teacher education at HGSE is an 11-month immersion in the guiding principles and hands-on practice of effective teaching in urban public schools. Here are some of the greatest benefits of getting your teacher training and certification through HGSE:

Urban, public focus – Every component of TEP is designed to prepare you for success in urban public schools. The core curriculum addresses topics like adolescent development in urban youth, classroom dynamics of race and class, and strategies for teaching students with diverse academic and emotional needs. To gain practical classroom experience, all TEP students work in the public schools of Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, and Somerville as student teaching interns alongside experienced teacher mentors.

Progressive classroom responsibility – TEP is designed to support the development of students’ practice gradually and progressively. During the summer component, Interns begin by team-teaching with an experienced mentor teacher at the Cambridge-Harvard Summer Academy. In the fall, Interns ramp up their classroom responsibilities and leadership at a carefully selected school site, under the guidance of a mentor teacher and HGSE field advisor. During the spring term, Interns are at their school sites full time, assuming lead responsibility for teaching one or two classes on a daily basis, while continuing to receive support and feedback from their mentors and HGSE field advisor. 

Advising and support – A unique component of TEP is our advisory system. Every TEP student is matched with an experienced HGSE advisor who provides small-group support to three or four TEP interns assigned to the same school site. At the beginning of the internship, advisors help students investigate the unique ethnography and dynamics of the school, and explore teaching and learning from different perspectives within the school (student, teacher, parent, etc.). As interns take over more classroom duties, advisors act as coaches, observing and providing constructive feedback and suggestions. The members of each advisory also support each other by sharing observations, experiences, and ideas that improve everyone’s classroom performance.

Cohort and community – Every TEP cohort consists of 20-25 remarkable individuals with a rich diversity of experience and a shared commitment to social justice. Their perspectives and friendships will greatly enrich your TEP experience. The same is true for the wider HGSE community. Your development as a teacher will be guided and influenced by conversations and friendships with colleagues studying adolescent development, language and literacy, technology in education, school leadership, and more. These same people will strengthen your professional network after graduation.

Harvard resources – By training as a teacher at Harvard, you have access to unrivaled academic resources across the University. We encourage you to cross-register for electives at the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Harvard Kennedy School, or Harvard Business School and to attend lectures, seminars, and conferences that relate to your content area or simply spark your imagination.

Curriculum

HGSE's Teacher Education Program offers graduate students two teacher licensure paths:

  • Teaching and Curriculum (TAC) – Designed for both recent college graduates and experienced professionals in the humanities who are committed to teaching in urban public middle and high schools
  • Mid-Career Math and Science (MCMS) – Designed exclusively for mid-career professionals in math- and science-related fields who want to teach math and/or science in urban public middle and high schools

Licensure

All TEP students complete the necessary coursework and fieldwork to receive an initial teaching license (valid for 5 years) in Massachusetts. Students will also need to pass the Massachusetts Tests for Education Licensure (MTEL) in their specific content area (biology, English, mathematics, etc.) and in Communication and Literacy Skills. Learn more about licensure requirements at the HGSE Licensure Unit Resource Center.


Coursework

The TEP curriculum is carefully designed to balance both theory and practice. The coursework and field experiences work together over 11 months to build your confidence and skills as a teacher. To graduate, you will need to successfully complete 36 credits of required courses and electives, and roughly 675 hours of classroom teaching.


SUMMER

One of the following:

  • T-210A1: Introduction to Teaching (English) (Sineath)
  • T-210A2: Introduction to Teaching (History/Political Science) (Reyes)
  • T-210A3: Introduction to Teaching (Mathematics) (Star)
  • T0210A4: Introduction to Teaching (Science) (Pereira)

H210A: Inquiries into Adolescence: Understanding and Supporting the Development of Urban Youth (Rubin)

T-210K: Power in Urban Classrooms (Walker)

T-210L: A Practical Approach to Classroom Management (Seider)

T210Z2: Elements of Diversity: Special Education (Harbour)


FALL

One of the following:

  • T-212: Teaching English (Sineath)
  • T-213: Teaching History/Political Science (Reyes)
  • T-214: Teaching Mathematics (Star)
  • T-215: Teaching Science (Pereira)

T-310: Pre-practicum in Secondary Education

T-210Z1: Dimensions of Diversity: English Language Learners (Leith) (to be taken during either fall or spring term)

2-3 Elective courses


SPRING

T-300: Practicum in Secondary Education

1 Elective (if not taken during fall term)

 

A note on electives: TEP students are required to take 3 electives, or a combination of courses and modules totaling 12 credits. These should consist of the following:

  • one-two electives that relate to the student's content area from any school at Harvard, or at MIT, the Fletcher School of Diplomacy at Tufts University, or the Episcopal Divinity School;
  • A course taught at HGSE and related to K-12 education.

 

 

Faculty

TEP faculty members are experienced classroom teachers whose diverse research interests span teaching, learning, and teacher leadership. Some TEP instructors explore issues of inclusivity, while others have received federal funding to research technology-based strategies for increasing student interest in STEM topics. Their personal experiences as teachers and scholars will enrich classroom discussions and arm you with techniques and methodologies that really work.

Wendy S. HarbourVicki A. JacobsChad LeithMeira LevinsonKatherine K. MersethVictor Pereira, Jr.Noel ReyesNoah A. RubinScott C. SeiderKarl Douglas SineathJon R. StarMarcus Aaron McKinley Walker
Students

TEP students come to HGSE from every imaginable academic and professional background. Some have formal teaching experience through Teach For America or the Peace Corps. Others are engineers, lawyers, and journalists who feel called to teaching after transformative personal experiences as tutors, mentors, or coaches. Many of our students see teaching as their lifelong career choice, while some are committed to four or five years in the classroom before pursuing other academic and professional goals.

Something all TEP students share is a deeply held belief in social justice. Whether in their formal careers or through campus and community organizations, TEP students demonstrate a passion for balancing the scales of inequality. These students are drawn to TEP for its focus on urban public education and its commitment to creating a more just and equitable society through better teachers and better schools.TEP student teaching

TAC Student Profile
Teaching and Curriculum (TAC) students are typically in their mid-to-late twenties, but the age range spans 21-50. TAC students demonstrate academic excellence and a deep knowledge of their content area plus a strong commitment to urban education.

MCMS Student Profile
Students in the Mid-Career Math and Science (MCMS) track at TEP have worked for five or more years in a math- or science-related field. Their decision to become a math or science teacher represents a significant career shift. The MCMS program is designed to ease the transition into the classroom and fully equip graduates for success in their new calling.

Alumni

TEP alumni are working in urban public middle schools and high schools in cities across America. Through their hard work as teacher-leaders, they reflect the core values of TEP and make an impact in the lives of their students, their schools, and their communities.

Apply

At TEP, we are looking for individuals with strong academic backgrounds who are deeply committed to urban public education. Tell us your story and how you hope to make an impact as a teacher-leader. Visit HGSE admissions to learn more about Ed.M. application requirements and deadlines, and get information about financial aid. Applications are due in January of the academic year you plan to enroll.

Contact

If you have questions about the admissions process or want to learn more about the benefits of TEP, please contact our admissions liaison Jamaal Barnes at askjamaal@gse.harvard.edu or 617-495-3414. If you have specific questions about TEP program requirements, please contact program administrator Susan Kandel at susan_kandel@gse.harvard.edu or 617-495-8854.