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Veronica Boix Mansilla

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Degree:  Ed.D., Harvard University, (2001)
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Phone:  617.496.6949
Office:  Longfellow 428
Faculty Assistant:  Scott Ruescher

Profile

Veronica Boix Mansilla is a principal investigator and Steering Committee member at Project Zero, HGSE, where she leads the IdGlobal Project and chairs the Future of Learning Institute. With a background in cognitive science, human development and education, she examines how to prepare our youth for a world of increasing complexity and interdependence. Her research focuses on three main areas. She studies (a) global competence as it develops among learners and teachers in various world regions; (b) quality interdisciplinary research and education among experts, teachers and youth; and (c) quality teaching and learning in disciplines (history, biology, the arts) as lenses through which to understand the world. She earned her Ed.M. and Ed.D. in Human Development and Psychology at HGSE (2001) and her B.A. at the Universidad de Buenos Aires (1989).

Click here to see a full list of Veronica Boix Mansilla's courses.

Areas of Expertise
Sponsored Projects


The World in Washington, DC: Toward a New Approach to Locally-Grounded Global Competence Education (2016-2017)
D.C. Public Education Fund

To participate in the world today young people must develop the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance, ranging from economic interdependence and human migration to sustainable development and urban wellbeing. We must cultivate young people’s capacity to engage in deep learning across disciplines to investigate the world, understand perspectives - others’ and their own -, communicate across differences through civil dialog and deliberation, and take creative, informed and responsible action. Meeting the challenge of preparing our youth for a culturally rooted global competence will require innovations in curriculum, instruction, and professional development (Boix Mansilla 2015). “The World in DC” draws on the most innovative research-based frameworks and tools developed at Project Zero to advance a city-based approach to educating for global competence. Specifically, we propose to work closely with DCPS and educators in the region to develop, test and disseminate an approach to teacher preparation, curriculum and instruction able to ensure a quality global competence education and create local capacity to sustain it. DCPS’ strategic focus on global education, the emergence of new globally-oriented schools, its commitment to professional development, and its emphasis on curricular “cornerstones,” World Language instruction and international travel for students present a unique opportunity to rethink what we teach and how we teach it if we are to prepare our youth as informed and participating actors in a society that must continue to learn to leverage its own diversity and to engage responsibly in the world. It is our hope that the approach developed by this project can become a model for other cities around the nation and in the world.


Global Competence Education through a US - China Lens (2016-2018)
Hong Kong WeiMing Education Limited

This project is an exploratory collaboration between Weiming Education Group and Project Zero, at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, designed to familiarize teachers in four schools within the network with frameworks and tools to teach for global competence. Such frameworks and tools are designed to enhance students’ understanding of the world and nurture global thinking dispositions that are essential to succeed in school and college, as well as in increasingly global workplaces. Specifically the project seeks to: (1) To advance participating Weiming teacher’s practical capacity to teach for global competence through the use of global thinking routines. (2) To understand how global thinking routines employed at the intersection of Chinese and Western pedagogical traditions contribute to teachers’ capacity to teach for global competence and to the development of students’ global competence. (3) To advise Weiming’s academic initiatives on matters of curriculum, instruction and professional development centered on global competence education and attentive to Chinese and Western cultural traditions. (4) To inform the field of global education through the lessons learned through our exploratory work at Weiming.


Global Competence in the Early Years Initiative (2015-2018)
Poppins Corporation

The project brings together a small group of early childhood teachers (5 to 8) to conduct a parallel small scale exploration of global competence development among children ages 3-5. We will select teachers from two or three institutions (e.g. Poppins’ Nishi-gotanda nursery school and a sister school or two in Washington DC., USA). Teachers and researchers will meet between 6 and 9 times between October 2015 and May 2016 in the first year. During such meetings, teachers, Poppins team members, and Project Zero advisors will learn about global competence, reflect on teaching designs developed by teachers, and share and discuss resources and documentation. We anticipate this exchange to continue until May 2018. The project is expected to yield a series of teacher-led learning-centered documentations and reflections (teacher-produced) and a summary document of the work of the year including curriculum and teaching materials for global competence in early years, for dissemination within Poppins schools as well as in Project Zero and DCPZ networks.


Global Competence in the Early Years Initiative (2015-2018)
Poppins Corporation

The project brings together a small group of early childhood teachers (5 to 8) to conduct a parallel small scale exploration of global competence development among children ages 3-5. We will select teachers from two or three institutions (e.g. Poppins’ Nishi-gotanda nursery school and a sister school or two in Washington DC., USA). Teachers and researchers will meet between 6 and 9 times between October 2015 and May 2016 in the first year. During such meetings, teachers, Poppins team members, and Project Zero advisors will learn about global competence, reflect on teaching designs developed by teachers, and share and discuss resources and documentation. We anticipate this exchange to continue until May 2018. The project is expected to yield a series of teacher-led learning-centered documentations and reflections (teacher-produced) and a summary document of the work of the year including curriculum and teaching materials for global competence in early years, for dissemination within Poppins schools as well as in Project Zero and DCPZ networks.


Signature Pedagogies in the Middle School Years: Understanding Excellence in Global Competence Education (2014-2016)
Longview Foundation for World Affairs and International Understanding, Inc.

Growing attention to global competence as a desirable educational outcome is creating unprecedented incentives to teach about the world, and to do so with quality. Pedagogical recommendations to teach for global competence abound and offer productive directions for practicing teachers and those who prepare them. However, little is known empirically about how recommended activities can be designed to maximize students’ global competence. The project we propose stems from the premise that, central to preparing and supporting teachers to design quality instruction for global competence is a much-needed empirical understanding of signature pedagogies in global education.

In 2013, the Longview Foundation supported our examination of two elementary school master teachers’ practices. These case studies enabled us to begin to develop a signature pedagogies framework to reveal key dimensions of these teachers’ embodied expertise. Our close analysis of exemplary teaching sequences (units, projects, assignments) characteristic of international education, shed light on (a) the various forms of expertise teachers integrate when nurturing powerful global learning; (b) the unique learning demands that such learning presents — demands that, while pivotal for deep learning, are not always visible to teachers; and (c) the uniquely contributing role that a signature pedagogies approach might play in teacher education.

In this study, we build on our findings and conduct two case studies of exemplary global competence instruction at the middle school level. As before, we document and explain master practices in teaching for global competence at the middle school level, and disseminate the documentation strategically in global education conferences and networks. We are persuaded that by offering visual documentations of master practices that make experienced teachers tacit expertise visible and accessible, a signature pedagogies approach to global education can contribute to the quality preparation of pre- and in-service teachers. The work enables us to compare signature pedagogies in global competence education at the elementary and middle school levels. A final framework synthesizing our findings from the four teaching cases will be produced and made available through publications and presentations at relevant education conferences, and we anticipate that the work here proposed will set the foundations for further work in teacher preparation and assessment in global education. We envision such a foundation inviting scholars and practitioners in the field to articulate additional signature pedagogies (e.g., in disciplines and educational levels not explored here), to develop well-informed teacher assessment systems (which capture multiple dimensions of teacher expertise), and to design teacher preparation curricula that attend to the unique demands of global education.


The Global Lens: Preparing our youth to engage the world through global media (2014-2014)
International Baccalaureate Organization

Working with the International Baccalaureate, the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Management, and The Washington International School, we plan to develop, test and disseminate a learning environment, a series of instructional modules, and an educational framework designed to nurture global competence through quality engagement with global media. The project seeks to prepare students in and beyond the International Baccalaureate to (a) conduct interdisciplinary inquiry about issues of global and local significance (climate change, food security, fragile states); and (b) analyze and produce related journalistic accounts, learning to participate in digital platforms responsibly. It is expected that the emerging instructional modules and educational framework will directly inform the IB Agora.

The project’s goals are to develop and test a global media learning environment to nurture global competence through a deliberately interdisciplinary, journalistic and digital media treatment of global issues; support educators to guide student-centered learning about global-local issues through a deliberately interdisciplinary, journalistic and digital media approach; understand and demonstrate impact on participating youth including their sense of themselves as local/global citizens, thoughtful producers and consumers of news, and informed and engaged participants in the digital world; and develop and test global media actionable learning frameworks uniquely tailored to nurture global competence –their capacity and disposition to understand and act on our changing world --through in-depth engagement with global-and local issues, news and digital media.


The world in Portland: Professional Learning in the Portland Public Schools. (2012-2014)
U.S. Department of Education

The "World in Portland" Project is a collaboration between the Portland Public Schools (PPS)and the Interdisciplinary Studies Project at Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education. The project seeks to prepare students for success in academic and career opportunities, and develop engaged and informed global citizens.

The "World in Portland" Project supports school leaders and K-12 teachers in teaching for global competence within and across disciplines.The project works with self-selected schools to build on existing practices that develop students' global competence (the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance) and deepens understanding in and across disciplines.The project also draws on community resources as potential collaborators in the development of new lessons and units and opportunities for learning about the world.

The project is structured around a leadership seminar; a teacher design group;the development of milestone learning experiences to mark the completion of elementary,middle, and high school;and the creation of a digital platform for the dissemination of project work. Expected outcomes include not only project participants' conceptual understanding of global education but also the development of school-level strategies,the adoption of new practices, and possibly the creation of tools and/or publications.

Publications

Boix Mansilla, V. Chua F. (2015) Signature Pedagogies in Global Education. International Perspectives on Global Education. In Print

Boix Mansilla, V. Gardner, H. (2000). On Disciplinary Lenses and Interdisciplinary Work. Interdisciplinary Curriculum Challenges of Implementation. Samuel Wineburg and Pamela Grossman (Eds.). New York: Teachers’ College Press. (17-38)

Boix Mansilla, V. et al. (2014) Educating for Global Competence: A Milestone Learning Experience Approach. Maine: Portland Public Schools

Boix Mansilla, V. Jackson A. (2014) Educating for Global Competence: Learning redefined for an interconnected world. In Heidi Jacobs Ed. Mastering Global Literacy: Comtemporary Perspectives on Literacy. New York: Solution Tree.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2012). (Editor).Teaching for Disciplinary Understanding with Big Ideas in Mind: A Teachers’ Guide. Cardiff: International Baccalaureate Press.

Boix Mansilla, V. Holland, M., Dang, A & White T. (2012). Teaching for Global Competence: A Literature Review. Available at: Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Project, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Chua, F., Boix Mansilla, V. van Breda, J. (2012). Incremental Upgrading in Enkanini, South Africa: A Case Study. Available at http://www.interdisciplines.org

Boix Mansilla (2012). What is the Purpose of a History Museum in a Global 21st Century? In History Education and the Construction of National Identity. Mario Carretero (Ed). Charlotte NC: Information Age Publishing.

Boix Mansilla, V. & Jackson A. (2011). Educating for Global Competence: Preparing our Youth to Engage the World. CCSSO-Asia Society. Available at: http://asiasociety.org/files/book-globalcompetence.pdf

Boix Mansilla, V. & Lenoir Y. (2011). Interdisciplinary Education in the United States: Past, Present and Future. Issues in Integrative Studies 29 (1-31)

Boix Mansilla, V. with Chua, F. & Dawes, E. (2010). The World Studies Extended Essay Nurturing Global Consciousness and Interdisciplinary Inquiry: Teachers’ Guide. Cardiff: International Baccalaureate Press.

Boix Mansilla,V., Lamont M., Chua, F., Ivanier, A. & Sato K. (2010). Successful Interdisciplinary Collaborations Case Studies: The MacArthur Research Networks, Santa Fe Institute and Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. Available at: Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Project, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2010). Learning to Synthesize: Toward an Epistemological Foundation for Interdisciplinary Learning. In Oxford Handbook of Interdisciplinarity. UK: Oxford University Press (288-306).

Boix Mansilla, V. (2009). Productive Shifts: Faculty Growth Through Collaborative Assessement of Student Interdisciplinary Work. Journal of Learning Communities Research 3. 3. (21-26)

Boix Mansilla, V. (2008). Teaching for Interdisciplinary Understanding in International Baccalaureate Schools. Cardiff: International Baccalaureate Press.

Boix Mansilla V., Dawes Duraisingh L., Wolfe C. & Haynes C. (2008). Targeted Assessment Rubric: An empirically grounded rubric to assess interdisciplinary writing. Journal of Higher Education 80. 3 (334-353)

Boix Mansilla V. & Gardner H. (2008). Disciplining the Mind to Prepare the Young for Tomorrow’s World. Educational Leadership. 65. 5 (14-19)

Boix Mansilla V. Gardner, H. (2007). From Teaching Globalization to Nurturing Global Consciousness. In Suarez Orozco, M. Editor. Learning in the Global Era; International Perspectives on Globalization and Education. California: University of California Press. (47-66)

Dawes Duraisingh L. & Boix Mansilla V. (2007). Interdisciplinary Forays Into the History Classroom: How the visual arts can enhance (or hinder) historical understanding. Teaching History 129 (22-30 )

Boix Mansilla, V. & Dawes Duraisingh L. (2007). Targeted Assessment: Toward a framework for assessing student interdisciplinary work. Journal of Higher Education 78, 2 (215-237)

Boix Mansilla, V. Rhodes, A. (2007). Intellectual Identity in Interdisciplinary Contexts. Available at: Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Project, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2006). Quality Assessment of Interdisciplinary Research: Toward empirically grounded validation criteria. Research Evaluation 14 4 (17-29)

Boix Mansilla V., Feller I. & Gardner H. (2006). Quality Assessment in Interdisciplinary Research and Education: A meeting report. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Washington, DC February 8, 2006. Research Evaluation. 14 4 (69-74)

Boix Mansilla, V. (2006). Interdisciplinary Work at the Frontier: An empirical examination of expert interdisciplinary epistemologies. Issues in Integrative Studies 24 (1-31)

Boix Mansilla, V. (2005). Assessing Student Work at Disciplinary Crossroads.Change Magazine 37. 1

Boix Mansilla, V. (2004). Between Reproducing and Organizing the Past: Students' beliefs about the standards of acceptability of historical knowledge. In International Review of Research History Education. London, Fran Cass.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2004). Abriendo Puertas a las Artes, la Mente y Mas Allá. CONACULTA: Mexico.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2001). Expecting High Standards from Inner City Kids Challenges and Possibilities. In International Review of History Education Research, London Fran Cass.

Miller, M. & Boix Mansilla. V. (2003). Thinking Across Perspectives and Disciplines. Internal Report available at www.pz.harrvard.edu/interdisciplinary.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2003). Opening Doors to the Arts, the Mind, and Beyond. Available at: Interdisciplinary and Global Studies, Project, Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Rhoten, D. Boix Mansilla, V., Chun M., & Klein J. (2006). Interdisciplinary Education at Liberal Arts Institutions. Teagle Foundation White paper. Available at www.teaglefoundation.org/learning/pdf/2006_ssrc_whitepaper.pdf

Ritchhart, R. & Boix Mansilla, V. (2003) Teaching for Understanding – Teaching for Transformation. In United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Belfer Exemplary Lessons. DC, 2003

Boix Mansilla, V. & Gardner H. (2003). Assessing Interdisciplinary Work at the Frontier: An empirical exploration of "symptoms” of quality. Available at www.Interdisciplines.org. CNRS and Institute Nicod, Paris.

Boix Mansilla, V. (2000). Can They Use What They Have Learned to Make Sense of the Present? Historical Understanding beyond the past and into the present. In Knowing Learning and Teaching History. Seixas, P. Stearns, P. and Wineburg S. (Eds.) San Francisco: Lawrence Erlbaum. (390-418)

Boix Mansilla V., Lamont M., & Sato K. (2015). Successful Interdisciplinary Collaborations: Toward a Socio-Emotional-Cognitive platform for interdisciplinary collaborations. Science technology and Human Values. In print

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